03
Luty
2019
09:02

SŁODKI KONIEC DNIA - plakat filmowy z Festiwalu w SUNDANCE 2019

zobacz więcej zdjęć (4)

Specjalna Nagroda Aktorska na Festiwalu Filmowym w Sundance 2019

Jury Festiwalu Filmowego WORLD FILM FESTIVAL SUNDANCE 2019 przyznało Specjalną Nagrodę Aktorską dla Krystyny Jandy za rolę w filmie SŁODKI KONIEC DNIA w reż. Jacka Borcucha.

A World Cinema Dramatic Special Jury Award for Acting was presented by Charles Gillbert to: Krystyna Janda, for Dolce Fine Giornata / Poland (Director: Jacek Borcuch, Screenwriters: Jacek Borcuch, Szczepan Twardoch, Producer: Marta Habior) — In Tuscany, Maria’s stable family life begins to erode as her relationship with a young immigrant develops against a backdrop of terrorism and eroding democracy.

2019 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS ANNOUNCED

 

Sunday, February 3rd, 2019

 

Top Prizes Go To Clemency, One Child Nation, The Souvenir andHoneyland 
Brittany Runs a Marathon, Knock Down the House, Queen of Hearts and Sea of Shadows Win Audience Awards

Park City, Utah — After 10 days and 121 feature films, the 2019 Sundance Film Festival’s Awards Ceremony took place tonight, with host Marianna Palka emceeing and jurors presenting 28 prizes for feature filmmaking. Honorees, named in total below, represent new achievements in global independent storytelling. Bold, intimate, and humanizing stories prevailed across categories, with Grand Jury Prizes awarded to Clemency (U.S. Dramatic), One Child Nation (U.S. Documentary), Honeyland (World Cinema Documentary) and The Souvenir (World Cinema Dramatic).

“Supporting artists and their stories has been at the core of Sundance Institute’s mission from the very beginning,” said Sundance Institute President and Founder Robert Redford. „At this critical moment, it’s more necessary than ever to support independent voices, to watch and listen to the stories they tell.”

„This year’s expansive Festival celebrated and championed risk-taking artists,” said Keri Putnam, the Institute’s Executive Director. „As the Festival comes to a close, we look forward to watching the stories and conversations that started here as they shape and define our culture in the year to come.”

“These past ten days have been extraordinary,” said John Cooper, Sundance Film Festival Director. „It’s been an honor to stand with these artists, and to see their work challenge, enlighten and charm its first audiences.”

The awards ceremony marked the culmination of the 2019 Festival, where 121 feature-length and 73 short films — selected from 14,259 submissions — were showcased in Park City, Salt Lake City and Sundance, Utah, alongside work in the new Indie Episodic category, panels, music and New Frontier. The ceremony was live-streamed; video is available at youtube.com/sff.

This year’s jurors, invited in recognition of their accomplishments in the arts, technical craft and visionary storytelling, deliberated extensively before presenting awards from the stage; this year’s jurors were Desiree Akhavan, Damien Chazelle, Dennis Lim, Phyllis Nagy, Tessa Thompson, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Yance Ford, Rachel Grady, Jeff Orlowski, Alissa Wilkinson, Jane Campion, Charles Gillibert, Ciro Guerra, Maite Alberdi, Nico Marzano, Véréna Paravel, Young Jean Lee, Carter Smith, Sheila Vand, and Laurie Anderson. Festival Favorite, an award voted on by audiences, will be announced in the coming days.

Feature film award winners in previous years include: The Miseducation of Cameron PostI don’t feel at home in this world anymore., WeinerWhiplash, Fruitvale Station, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Twenty Feet from Stardom, Searching for Sugarman, The Square, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, Cartel Land, The Wolf Pack, The Diary of a Teenage Girl, Dope, Dear White People, The Cove and Man on Wire.

Of the 28 prizes awarded tonight to 23 films – comprising the work of 27 filmmakers – 13 (56.5%) were directed by one or more women; eight (34.8%) were directed by one or more people of color; and one (4.3%) was directed by a person who identifies as LGBTQI+.

2019 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL FEATURE FILM AWARDS

The U.S. Grand Jury Prize: Documentary was presented by Rachel Grady to: Nanfu Wang and Jialing Zhang, for One Child Nation / China, U.S.A. (Directors: Nanfu Wang, Jialing Zhang, Producers: Nanfu Wang, Jialing Zhang, Julie Goldman, Christoph Jörg, Christopher Clements, Carolyn Hepburn) — After becoming a mother, a filmmaker uncovers the untold history of China’s one-child policy and the generations of parents and children forever shaped by this social experiment.

The U.S. Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic was presented by Damien Chazelle to: Chinonye Chukwu, for Clemency / U.S.A. (Director and screenwriter: Chinonye Chukwu, Producers: Bronwyn Cornelius, Julian Cautherley, Peter Wong, Timur Bekbosunov) — Years of carrying out death row executions have taken a toll on prison warden Bernadine Williams. As she prepares to execute another inmate, Bernadine must confront the psychological and emotional demons her job creates, ultimately connecting her to the man she is sanctioned to kill. Cast: Alfre Woodard, Aldis Hodge, Richard Schiff, Wendell Pierce, Richard Gunn, Danielle Brooks.

The World Cinema Grand Jury Prize: Documentary was presented by Verena Paravel to: Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov, for Honeyland / Macedonia (Directors: Ljubomir Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska, Producer: Atanas Georgiev) — When nomadic beekeepers break Honeyland’s basic rule (take half of the honey, but leave half to the bees), the last female beehunter in Europe must save the bees and restore natural balance.

The World Cinema Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic was presented by Jane Campion to: Joanna Hogg, for The Souvenir / United Kingdom (Director and screenwriter: Joanna Hogg, Producers: Luke Schiller, Joanna Hogg) — A shy film student begins finding her voice as an artist while navigating a turbulent courtship with a charismatic but untrustworthy man. She defies her protective mother and concerned friends as she slips deeper and deeper into an intense, emotionally fraught relationship which comes dangerously close to destroying her dreams. Cast: Honor Swinton Byrne, Tom Burke, Tilda Swinton.

The Audience Award: U.S. Documentary, Presented by Acura was presented by Mark Duplass to: Knock Down the House / U.S.A. (Director: Rachel Lears, Producers: Sarah Olson, Robin Blotnick, Rachel Lears) — A young bartender in the Bronx, a coal miner’s daughter in West Virginia, a grieving mother in Nevada and a registered nurse in Missouri build a movement of insurgent candidates challenging powerful incumbents in Congress. One of their races will become the most shocking political upset in recent American history. Cast: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

The Audience Award: U.S. Dramatic, Presented by Acura was presented by Paul Downs Colaizzo to: Brittany Runs A Marathon / U.S.A. (Director and screenwriter: Paul Downs Colaizzo, Producers: Matthew Plouffe, Tobey Maguire, Margot Hand) — A woman living in New York takes control of her life – one city block at a time. Cast:Jillian Bell, Michaela Watkins, Utkarsh Ambudkar, Lil Rel Howery, Micah Stock, Alice Lee.

The Audience Award: World Cinema Documentary was presented by Ray Romano to: Sea of Shadows / Austria (Director: Richard Ladkani, Producers: Walter Koehler, Wolfgang Knoepfler) —The vaquita, the world’s smallest whale, is near extinction as its habitat is destroyed by Mexican cartels and Chinese mafia, who harvest the swim bladder of the totoaba fish, the “cocaine of the sea.” Environmental activists, Mexican navy and undercover investigators are fighting back against this illegal multimillion-dollar business.

The Audience Award: World Cinema Dramatic was presented by Mark Duplass to: Queen of Hearts / Denmark (Director: May el-Toukhy, Screenwriters: Maren Louise Käehne, May el-Toukhy, Producers: Caroline Blanco, René Ezra) — A woman jeopardizes both her career and her family when she seduces her teenage stepson and is forced to make an irreversible decision with fatal consequences. Cast: Trine Dyrholm, Gustav Lindh, Magnus Krepper.

The Audience Award: NEXT, Presented by Adobe was presented by Danielle Macdonald to: The Infiltrators / U.S.A. (Directors: Alex Rivera, Cristina Ibarra, Screenwriters: Alex Rivera, Aldo Velasco, Producers: Cristina Ibarra, Alex Rivera, Darren Dean) — A rag-tag group of undocumented youth – Dreamers – deliberately get detained by Border Patrol in order to infiltrate a shadowy, for-profit detention center. Cast: Maynor Alvarado, Manuel Uriza, Chelsea Rendon, Juan Gabriel Pareja, Vik Sahay.

The Directing Award: U.S. Documentary was presented by Yance Ford to: Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert, for American Factory / U.S.A. (Directors: Steven Bognar, Julia Reichert, Producers: Steven Bognar, Julia Reichert, Jeff Reichert, Julie Parker Benello) — In post-industrial Ohio, a Chinese billionaire opens a new factory in the husk of an abandoned General Motors plant, hiring two thousand blue-collar Americans. Early days of hope and optimism give way to setbacks as high-tech China clashes with working-class America.

The Directing Award: U.S. Dramatic was presented by Desiree Akhavan to: Joe Talbot, for The Last Black Man in San Francisco / U.S.A. (Director: Joe Talbot, Screenwriters: Joe Talbot, Rob Richert, Producers: Khaliah Neal, Joe Talbot, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Christina Oh) — Jimmie Fails dreams of reclaiming the Victorian home his grandfather built in the heart of San Francisco. Joined on his quest by his best friend Mont, Jimmie searches for belonging in a rapidly changing city that seems to have left them behind.

The Directing Award: World Cinema Documentary was presented by Maite Alberdi to: Mads Brügger, for Cold Case Hammarskjöld / Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Belgium (Director: Mads Brügger, Producers: Peter Engel, Andreas Rocksén, Bjarte M. Tveit) — Danish director Mads Brügger and Swedish private investigator Göran Bjorkdahl are trying to solve the mysterious death of Dag Hammarskjold. As their investigation closes in, they discover a crime far worse than killing the Secretary-General of the United Nations.

The Directing Award: World Cinema Dramatic was presented by Ciro Guerra to: Lucía Garibaldi, for The Sharks / Uruguay, Argentina, Spain (Director and screenwriter: Lucía Garibaldi, Producers: Pancho Magnou Arnábal, Isabel García) — While a rumor about the presence of sharks in a small beach town distracts residents, 15-year-old Rosina begins to feel an instinct to shorten the distance between her body and Joselo’s. Cast: Romina Bentancur, Federico Morosini, Fabián Arenillas, Valeria Lois, Antonella Aquistapache.

The Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award: U.S. Dramatic was presented by Phyllis Nagy to: Pippa Bianco, for Share / U.S.A. (Director and screenwriter: Pippa Bianco, Producers: Carly Hugo, Tyler Byrne, Matt Parker) — After discovering a disturbing video from a night she doesn’t remember, sixteen-year-old Mandy must try to figure out what happened and how to navigate the escalating fallout. Cast: Rhianne Barreto, Charlie Plummer, Poorna Jagannathan, J.C. MacKenzie, Nick Galitzine, Lovie Simone.

U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Moral Urgency was presented by Alissa Wilkinson to: Jacqueline Olive, for Always in Season / U.S.A. (Director: Jacqueline Olive, Producers: Jacqueline Olive, Jessica Devaney) — When 17-year-old Lennon Lacy is found hanging from a swing set in rural North Carolina in 2014, his mother’s search for justice and reconciliation begins as the trauma of more than a century of lynching African Americans bleeds into the present.

U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award: Emerging Filmmaker was presented by Jeff Orlowski to: Liza Mandelup, for Jawline / U.S.A. (Director: Liza Mandelup, Producers: Bert Hamelinck, Sacha Ben Harroche, Hannah Reyer) — The film follows 16-year-old Austyn Tester, a rising star in the live-broadcast ecosystem who built his following on wide-eyed optimism and teen girl lust, as he tries to escape a dead-end life in rural Tennessee.

U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Editing was presented by Alissa Wilkinson to: Todd Douglas Miller, for APOLLO 11 / U.S.A. (Director: Todd Douglas Miller, Producers: Todd Douglas Miller, Thomas Petersen, Evan Krauss) — A purely archival reconstruction of humanity’s first trip to another world, featuring never-before-seen 70mm footage and never-before-heard audio from the mission.

U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Cinematography was presented by Jeff Orlowski to: Luke Lorentzen, Midnight Family / Mexico, U.S.A. (Director: Luke Lorentzen, Producers: Kellen Quinn, Daniela Alatorre, Elena Fortes, Luke Lorentzen) — In Mexico City’s wealthiest neighborhoods, the Ochoa family runs a private ambulance, competing with other for-profit EMTs for patients in need of urgent help. As they try to make a living in this cutthroat industry, they struggle to keep their financial needs from compromising the people in their care.

U.S. Dramatic Special Jury Award for Vision and Craft was presented by Tessa Thompson to: Alma Har’el for her film Honey Boy / U.S.A. (Director: Alma Har’el, Screenwriter: Shia LaBeouf, Producers: Brian Kavanaugh-Jones, Daniela Taplin Lundberg, Anita Gou, Christopher Leggett, Alma Har’el) — A child TV star and his ex-rodeo clown father face their stormy past through time and cinema. Cast: Shia LaBeouf, Lucas Hedges, Noah Jupe.

U.S. Dramatic Special Jury Award for Creative Collaboration was presented by Dennis Lim to: Director Joe Talbot for his film The Last Black Man in San Francisco / U.S.A. (Director: Joe Talbot, Screenwriters: Joe Talbot, Rob Richert, Producers: Khaliah Neal, Joe Talbot, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Christina Oh) — Jimmie Fails dreams of reclaiming the Victorian home his grandfather built in the heart of San Francisco. Joined on his quest by his best friend Mont, Jimmie searches for belonging in a rapidly changing city that seems to have left them behind. Cast: Jimmie Fails, Jonathan Majors, Rob Morgan, Tichina Arnold, Danny Glover.

U.S. Dramatic Special Jury Award for Achievement in Acting was presented by Tessa Thompson to: Rhianne Barreto, for Share / U.S.A. (Director and screenwriter: Pippa Bianco, Producers: Carly Hugo, Tyler Byrne, Matt Parker) — After discovering a disturbing video from a night she doesn’t remember, sixteen-year-old Mandy must try to figure out what happened and how to navigate the escalating fallout. Cast: Rhianne Barreto, Charlie Plummer, Poorna Jagannathan, J.C. MacKenzie, Nick Galitzine, Lovie Simone.

World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Award for No Borders was presented by Maite Alberdi to: Hassan Fazzili, for Midnight Traveler / U.S.A., Qatar, United Kingdom, Canada (Director: Hassan Fazili, Screenwriter: Emelie Mahdavian, Producers: Emelie Mahdavian, Su Kim) — When the Taliban puts a bounty on Afghan director Hassan Fazili’s head, he is forced to flee with his wife and two young daughters. Capturing their uncertain journey, Fazili shows firsthand the dangers facing refugees seeking asylum and the love shared between a family on the run.

World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Award for Impact for Change was presented by Nico Marzano to: Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov, for Honeyland / Macedonia (Directors: Ljubomir Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska, Producer: Atanas Georgiev) — When nomadic beekeepers break Honeyland’s basic rule (take half of the honey, but leave half to the bees), the last female beehunter in Europe must save the bees and restore natural balance.

World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Award for Cinematographywas presented by Nico Marzano to: Fejmi Daut and Samir Ljuma, for Honeyland / Macedonia (Directors: Ljubomir Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska, Producer: Atanas Georgiev) — When nomadic beekeepers break Honeyland’s basic rule (take half of the honey, but leave half to the bees), the last female beehunter in Europe must save the bees and restore natural balance.

World Cinema Dramatic Special Jury Award for Originality was presented by Ciro Guerra to: Makoto Nagahisa, for WE ARE LITTLE ZOMBIES / Japan (Director and screenwriter: Makoto Nagahisa, Producers: Taihei Yamanishi, Shinichi Takahashi, Haruki Yokoyama, Haruhiko Hasegawa) — Their parents are dead. They should be sad, but they can’t cry. So they form a kick-ass band. This is the story of four 13-year-olds in search of their emotions. Cast: Keita Ninomiya, Satoshi Mizuno, Mondo Okumura, Sena Nakajima.

World Cinema Dramatic Special Jury Award was presented by Charles Gillbert to: Alejandro Landes, for Monos / Colombia, Argentina, Netherlands, Germany, Sweden, Uruguay (Director: Alejandro Landes, Screenwriters: Alejandro Landes, Alexis Dos Santos, Producers: Alejandro Landes, Fernando Epstein, Santiago Zapata, Cristina Landes) — On a faraway mountaintop, eight kids with guns watch over a hostage and a conscripted milk cow. Cast: Julianne Nicholson, Moisés Arias, Sofia Buenaventura, Deiby Rueda, Karen Quintero, Laura Castrillón.

World Cinema Dramatic Special Jury Award for Acting was presented by Charles Gillbert to: Krystyna Janda, for Dolce Fine Giornata / Poland (Director: Jacek Borcuch, Screenwriters: Jacek Borcuch, Szczepan Twardoch, Producer: Marta Habior) — In Tuscany, Maria’s stable family life begins to erode as her relationship with a young immigrant develops against a backdrop of terrorism and eroding democracy.

The NEXT Innovator Prize was presented by juror Laurie Anderson to: Alex Rivera and Cristina Ibarra, for The Infiltrators / U.S.A. (Directors: Alex Rivera, Cristina Ibarra, Screenwriters: Alex Rivera, Aldo Velasco, Producers: Cristina Ibarra, Alex Rivera, Darren Dean) — A rag-tag group of undocumented youth – Dreamers – deliberately get detained by Border Patrol in order to infiltrate a shadowy, for-profit detention center. Cast: Maynor Alvarado, Manuel Uriza, Chelsea Rendon, Juan Gabriel Pareja, Vik Sahay.

The following awards were presented at separate ceremonies at the Festival:

SHORT FILM AWARDS:
Jury prizes and honorable mentions in short filmmaking were presented at a ceremony in Park City on January 29. The Short Film Grand Jury Prize was awarded to: Aziza / Syria, Lebanon (Director: Soudade Kaadan, Screenwriters: Soudade Kaadan, May Hayek). The Short Film Jury Award: U.S. Fiction was presented to: Green / U.S.A. (Director: Suzanne Andrews Correa, Screenwriters: Suzanne Andrews Correa, Mustafa Kaymak). The Short Film Jury Award: International Fiction was presented to: Dunya’s Day / Saudi Arabia, U.S.A. (Director and screenwriter: Raed Alsemari). The Short Film Jury Award: Nonfiction was presented to: Ghosts of Sugar Land / U.S.A. (Director: Bassam Tariq). The Short Film Jury Award: Animation was presented to: Reneepoptosis / U.S.A., Japan (Director and screenwriter: Renee Zhan). Two Special Jury Awards for Directing werepresented to: FAST HORSE / Canada (Director and screenwriter: Alexandra Lazarowich) and The MINORS / U.S.A. (Director and screenwriter: Robert Machoian). The Short Film jurors were Young Jean Lee, Carter Smith and Sheila Vand. The Short Film program is presented by YouTube.

SUNDANCE INSTITUTE | ALFRED P. SLOAN FEATURE FILM PRIZE
The 2019 Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize, presented to an outstanding feature film about science or technology, was presented to The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. The filmmakers received a $20,000 cash award from Sundance Institute with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

SUNDANCE INSTITUTE | AMAZON STUDIOS PRODUCERS AWARDS
Carly Hugo and Matt Parker received the 2019 Sundance Institute | Amazon Studios Producers Awards for Feature Film. Lori Cheatlereceived the 2019 Sundance Institute | Amazon Studios Producers Award for Documentary Film. The award recognizes bold vision and a commitment to continuing work as a creative producer in the independent space, and grants money (via the Sundance Institute Feature Film Program and Documentary Film Program) to emerging producers of films at the Sundance Film Festival.

The Sundance Institute / NHK Award was presented to Planet Korsakov(Japan) / Taro Aoshima.

The Sundance Film Festival®
The Sundance Film Festival has introduced global audiences to some of the most groundbreaking films of the past three decades, including Sorry to Bother YouWon’t You Be My Neighbor?Eighth GradeGet OutThe Big SickMudboundBeasts of the Southern WildFruitvale StationWhiplashBrooklynPreciousThe CoveLittle Miss SunshineAn Inconvenient TruthNapoleon DynamiteHedwig and the Angry InchReservoir Dogs and sex, lies, and videotape. The Festival is a program of the non-profit Sundance Institute®. The Festival is a program of the non-profit Sundance Institute®. 2019 Festival sponsors include: Presenting Sponsors – Acura, SundanceTV, Chase Sapphire, YouTube; Leadership Sponsors – Adobe, Amazon Studios, AT&T, DIRECTV, Dropbox, Netflix, Omnicom, Stella Artois; Sustaining Sponsors – Ancestry, Canada Goose, Canon, Dell, Francis Ford Coppola Winery, GEICO, High West Distillery, IMDbPro, Lyft, RIMOWA, Unity Technologies, University of Utah Health; Media Sponsors – The Atlantic, IndieWire, Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, VARIETY, The Wall Street Journal. Sundance Institute recognizes critical support from the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development, and the State of Utah as Festival Host State. The support of these organizations helps offset the Festival’s costs and sustain the Institute’s year-round programs for independent artists. Look for the Official Partner seal at their venues at the Festival. sundance.org/festival

Sundance Institute
Founded in 1981 by Robert Redford, Sundance Institute is a nonprofit organization that provides and preserves the space for artists in film, theatre, and media to create and thrive. The Institute’s signature Labs, granting, and mentorship programs, dedicated to developing new work, take place throughout the year in the U.S. and internationally. The Sundance Film Festival and other public programs connect audiences to artists in igniting new ideas, discovering original voices, and building a community dedicated to independent storytelling. Sundance Institute has supported such projects as Sorry to Bother You, Eighth Grade, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, Hereditary, RBG, Call Me By Your Name, Get Out, The Big Sick, Top of the Lake, Winter’s Bone, Dear White People, Brooklyn, Little Miss Sunshine, 20 Feet From Stardom, Beasts of the Southern WildFruitvale Station, I’m Poppy, America to Me, Leimert Park, Spring AwakeningA Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder and Fun Home. Join Sundance Institute on Facebook,Instagram, Twitter and YouTube.

# # #

Editor’s note: For images, visit sundance.org/photos or image.net(registration free but required).

 

https://www.sundance.org/blogs/news/2019-sundance-film-festival-awards-announced?fbclid=IwAR0cLNAidUUWmJYqvdIEBD4TtXikEswqwusPsS4UeEFbiaQ1QIYR6jHYETc

 

————————————— —————– ——————————

 

03/02/2019

Słodki koniec festiwalu w Sundance

 „Dolce fine giornata” (Słodki koniec dnia) w reżyserii Jacka Borcucha z Nagrodą w Sundance. Jury doceniło Krystynę Jandę grającą główną rolę w filmie. 

„Jacek Borcuch swoim pokazanym na festiwalu w Sundance filmem zabrał głos w sprawie kryzysu uchodźczego. Jego bohaterka grana przez Krystynę Jandę to Polka mieszkająca we Włoszech. Jej niepoprawna politycznie przemowa spada na lokalną społeczność jak bomba. W tym samym czasie, gdy prawdziwa bomba terroryzuje Rzym…” – pisze Anna Tatarska w relacji z Sundance dla Vogue.pl

 

Bohaterka filmu, Maria Lange (Krystyna Janda), jest polską  pisarką żydowskiego pochodzenia i laureatką Nagrody Nobla. Maria jest szanowana przez opinię publiczną na całym świecie i darzona wielką sympatią małej społeczności toskańskiej Volterry, którą wybrała na swój dom.

Kilka dni po tragicznym ataku na stolicę Włoch, Maria wykorzystuje  uroczystość wręczenia lokalnych nagród  do wygłoszenia  kontrowersyjnej przemowy o dwulicowości polityki uchodźczej we Włoszech i w Europie. Wystąpienie pisarki odbije się szerokim echem, zmieniając jej status w społeczeństwie i sytuację jej bliskich.

 

  • Tak naprawdę nie wiadomo, jednoznacznie, po której stronie jest Maria prywatnie. Teza, którą stawia w przemówieniu, jest bardzo kontrowersyjna. To quasi-terrorystyczny intelektualnie akt, wynikający z głębokiej niezgody na ogólną sytuację. Maria wypowiada się jako artystka. Ale czy artysta ma prawo do tego typu bulwersujących wypowiedzi: że akt terrorystyczny może być sztuką? Myślę, że film, ma takie prawo. Ta scena to otworzenie tematu, prowokacja zmuszająca do namysłu i prowokująca dla widzów.  Scenariusz celowo tego nie definiuje do końca, ani ja tego nie definiowałam grając. Byłoby to naiwne w obliczu złożoności problemów jakie mamy w tej chwili w Europie i na świecie. w tym scenariuszu podobało mi się właśnie to, postawienie tylu pytań, otworzenie tylu tematów, problemów,  pozostawionych do rozsądzenia widzowi – mówiła Krystyna Janda dla Vogue.pl

 

Kasia Smutniak, wcielająca się w rolę córki głównej bohaterki w wypowiedzi dla „Gazety Wyborczej”dodawała: – Dokładnie teraz, kiedy my pokazujemy na Sundance nasz film, we Włoszech właśnie dzieje się historia. Kilka dni temu do portu w Syrakuzach przybył statek „Sea Watch”, na którym przebywa 47 uratowanych z morza migrantów. Rząd udzielił zgody na cumowanie, jednocześnie podtrzymując decyzję o zakazie zejścia na ląd z powodu przekroczenia ustalonych limitów.  To nie jest abstrakcyjny temat, on dotyka nas wszystkich. Kiedy z sytuacji moralnej robi się sytuację polityczną, to jest moment, w którym trzeba wstać i wyjść na ulice. To właśnie dzieje się teraz we Włoszech.

Scenariusz filmu to wspólne dzieło reżysera Jacka Borcucha i pisarza Szczepana Twardocha.

Jacek Borcuch jest stałym gościem Sundance. W 2009 roku pokazywał tu  „Wszystko, co kocham”. Cztery lata później w konkursie festiwalu wystartował jego film „Nieulotne”, przynosząc nagrodę za zdjęcia Michałowi Englertowi.

 

  • materiały prasowe/ redakcja

 

gildia reżyserów polskich.pl, 03.02.2019

 

http://polishdirectors.com/slodki-koniec-festiwalu-w-sundance/?fbclid=IwAR1PoFIX_FcWxOws-JQTq1nzMDs5D8XwDPqg9q3f2Qm8ZoOvfkfPJ2oXrKo

 

 

——————————— ————— ———— ———————-

 

Krystyna Janda triumfuje w Sundance!

 

To dopiero wiadomość! Na zakończonym 3 lutego 2019 r. festiwalu w Sundance Krystyna Janda otrzymała nagrodę aktorską za kreację w filmie Jacka Borcucha „Słodki koniec dnia” („Dolce Fine Giornata”).

O nagrodzie dla polskiej aktorki poinformowała na Facebooku producentka filmu, Marta Habior (No Sugar Films). Film z udziałem m.in. Krystyny Jandy i Kasi Smutniak znalazł się w prestiżowym konkursie World Cinema Dramatic Festiwalu Filmowego Sundance. To jeden z najważniejszych amerykańskich festiwali filmowych, którego założycielem jest Robert Redford. To trzeci film Jacka Borcucha, który znalazł się w selekcji Festiwalu Filmowego Sundance. W 2013 roku „Nieulotne” brały udział w  konkursie międzynarodowym, w 2009 roku „Wszystko, co kocham” było pierwszym polskim tytułem pokazywanym na festiwalu.

 

„Słodki koniec dnia” to historia o miłości, tęsknocie i utraconych nadziejach. O lęku przed nieznanym i pasji życia. Miejscem akcji filmu jest włoska prowincja, etruskie miasto Volterra. Tu od lat mieszka Maria – polska poetka, laureatka Nagrody Nobla, autorytet moralny. Świat bohaterów zostaje wywrócony do góry nogami, gdy otrzymują szokującą wiadomość o zamachu terrorystycznym w Rzymie. Bezkompromisowość i niepoprawność polityczna Marii okazują się mieć dramatyczne konsekwencje. „Wbrew dominującej narracji w niezwykle napiętym, wrażliwym momencie kobieta nie idzie na kompromis. Z pogardą i bolesną szczerością mówi o dwulicowości polityki uchodźczej we Włoszech i w Europie. Jej słowa spadają niczym bomba, kilka dni wcześniej zdetonowana w Rzymie przez terrorystów. Poniosą się wiralową falą po świecie, przysparzając przykrych konsekwencji nie tylko włodarzom, ale także bliskim pisarki. Gdy przemowa Marii stawia ją w centrum zainteresowania, traci status gwiazdy, której wolno więcej” – pisze Anna Tatarska dla Vogue.pl.

 

Autorami scenariusza są Jacek Borcuch i Szczepan Twardoch. Dla pierwszego z nich będzie to piąty tytuł na podstawie autorskiego scenariusza (po m.in. „Wszystko, co kocham” i „Nieulotnych”). Dla Szczepana Twardocha, autora takich książek jak „Morfina” czy „Król” i laureata Nagrody Fundacji im. Kościelskich, Nagrody Nike i Paszportu „Polityki”, to debiut w roli scenarzysty.  Za zdjęcia odpowiada Michał Dymek, a za scenografię Elwira Pluta.

 

sfp.org. pl. wydarzenia, 03.02.2019, 07:01

 

https://www.sfp.org.pl/wydarzenia,5,28305,1,1,Krystyna-Janda-triumfuje-w-Sundance.html?fbclid=IwAR2bzBlUaw1MzWYPQ9V6ZobBJwOrFurh9152kUndBqdPxBXzIA2luJdumYg

 

————————————– ——————— —————————————-

 

Sundance 2019. Krystyna Janda z nagrodą aktorską za rolę w filmie „Słodki koniec dnia”

 

Krystyna Janda najlepszą aktorką Sundance Film Festival 2019! Za główną rolę w „Słodkim końcu dnia”, w którym wciela się w postać pisarki Marii, otrzymała nagrodę w konkursie World Dramatic Competition.

W amerykańskim Park City w stanie Utah zakończył się Sundance Film Festiwal 2019 – największy coroczny festiwal kina niezależnego, którego ambasadorem jest Robert Redford. Na festiwalu swoją premierę miał „Słodki koniec dnia” z Krystyną Jandą i Kasią Smutniak w rolach głównych. Polska produkcja, której akcja rozgrywa się we Włoszech, to już trzeci obraz Jacka Borcucha, który trafił na Sundance. Wcześniej pokazywane były tu „Wszystko co kocham” i „Nieulotne”

W sekcji World Cinema Dramatic Competition film Borcucha (na festiwalu występujący pod oryginalnym tytułem „Dolce Fine Giornata”) rywalizował z takimi tytułami jak „Judy & Punch” (Australia) z Mią Wasikowską, „Queen of Hearts” (Dania) z Trine Dyrholm (Złota Palma w Cannes za film „Komuna”) i „The Souvenir” (Wielka Brytania) z Tildą Swinton.

 

Choć główna nagroda w tej sekcji przypadła właśnie ostatniemu z tytułów, filmowi „The Souvenir” w reżyserii Joanny Hogg, to najważniejsze wyróżnienie aktorskie – Special Jury Award for Acting – otrzymała Krystyna Janda.

 

W najnowszym filmie Jacka Borcucha Krystyna Janda wciela się w postać Marii, polskiej poetki i noblistki, nawiązującej romans z dużo młodszym Nazeerem (debiutujący Lorenzo de Moor), egipskim imigrantem.

„Historia o miłości, tęsknocie i utraconych nadziejach. Świat bohaterów zostaje wywrócony do góry nogami, gdy otrzymują szokującą wiadomość o zamachu terrorystycznym w Rzymie. Bezkompromisowość i niepoprawność polityczna Marii okazują się mieć dramatyczne konsekwencje” – zapowiada najnowsze dzieło Borcucha dystrybutor, Next Film.

Zagraniczna prasa po pierwszych pokazach filmu podkreślała jego społeczno-polityczny wymiar, nawiązując do kryzysu uchodźczego. „Słodki koniec dnia” nazwano „subtelnym i pięknym”, a kreację Jandy „fascynującą”.

 

onet film.pl, 03.02.2019, 09:42

 

https://kultura.onet.pl/film/wiadomosci/sundance-2019-krystyna-janda-z-nagroda-aktorska-za-role-w-filmie-slodki-koniec-dnia/vks2smh?utm_source=onetsg_fb_viasg_kultura&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=onetsg_fb&srcc=ucs&utm_v=2

 

­­­­­­­­­­—————————— ————————————————- ——————————-

 

Sundance 2019. Krystyna Janda nagrodzona za rolę w filmie „Słodki koniec dnia”

 

Na zakończonym właśnie festiwalu filmów niezależnych Sundance w Park City w USA Krystyna Janda otrzymała nagrodę aktorską za główną rolę w filmie „Słodki koniec dnia” Jacka Borcucha.

 

W filmie Borcucha Krystyna Janda gra Marię Linde, polską noblistkę, która mieszka z mężem w małym miasteczku Volterra w Toskanii. Ich dom to kulturalno-towarzyskie centrum lokalnej elity. Ale Maria nie pasuje do życia statecznej żony i babci. Wda się w romans z mającym egipskie korzenie chłopakiem. Wygłosi niepoprawną politycznie mowę, która wywoła skandal. Życie wszystkich bohaterów niespodziewanie zmieni się o 180 stopni, gdy we Włoszech dojdzie do ataku terrorystycznego…

 

– Myślę, że ten film został zrobiony po coś. Nie można go rozpatrywać jako wyłącznie opowiastkę. (…) To jest głos w europejskim dialogu, cenna wypowiedź i świetnie, że się znalazł na festiwalu, który ma taki prestiż i jest szanowany – mówiła Janda w rozmowie z Anną Tatarską dla Onetu.

Krystyna Janda z nagrodą na Sundance

„Słodki koniec dnia” to głos w dyskusji o dzisiejszej Europie, jej radzeniu sobie z napływem imigrantów, rosnącym strachem przed nimi. „Lęk przed innością jest tak silnym uczuciem, że ludzie są gotowi wiele oddać, by go nie czuć. Także swoją wolność” – mówi w pewnym momencie Maria.

 

To już trzeci film Borcucha, który brał udział w festiwalu Sundance. W 2010 r. reżyser przyjechał do Park City z „Wszystko, co kocham”, a w 2013 r. – z „Nieulotnym”. Współautorem scenariusza „Słodkiego końca dnia” jest pisarz Szczepan Twardoch. Córkę Marii Linde gra Kasia Smutniak, znana m.in. z filmów „Dobrze się kłamie w miłym towarzystwie” Paola Genovese czy ostatnio „Oni” Paola Sorrentino.

Festiwal Sundance

  1. edycja Sundance Film Festivalu w Park City w stanie Utah trwała od 24 stycznia. To największe święto niezależnego kina, którego pomysłodawcą i założycielem jest Robert Redford.

W tym roku festiwal to przestrzeń wyrównywania szans. Ponad 45 proc. autorów pokazywanych tu filmów to kobiety, a 63 proc. relacjonujących wydarzenie dziennikarzy to przedstawiciele grup uznawanych za wykluczone w tradycyjnie męskocentrycznej i białej branży.

 

wyborcza.pl, red.3 lutego 2019, 10:00

http://wyborcza.pl/7,101707,24425185,sundance-2019-krystyna-janda-nagrodzona-za-role-w-filmie-slodki.html?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=SM&utm_campaign=FB_Gazeta_Wyborcza&fbclid=IwAR25orJmqQyIRlhX_88gRUxwgOfUlNXEmAYcPb2B9QW3IGc1YTuhaOFLPew

———————————————– ————————– —————————————————–

Krystyna Janda najlepszą aktorką festiwalu Sundance 2019!

 

Jury najbardziej znanego na świecie festiwalu filmów niezależnych Sundance w Park City w USA doceniło grę aktorską Krystyny Jandy w filmie „Dolce Fine Giornata” Jacka Borcucha.

„Lęk przed innością jest tak silnym uczuciem, że ludzie są gotowi wiele oddać, by go nie czuć. Także swoją wolność” – mówi w najnowszym filmie Jacka Borcucha Maria Linde, postać, w którą wciela się Krystyna Janda.

To polska noblistka mieszkająca wraz z mężem w miasteczku Volterra we włoskiej Toskanii, która nie potrafi przystosować się do roli ułożonej żony i babci.

Wywoła skandal romansem z młodszym mężczyzną egipskiego pochodzenia.

Właśnie tę rolę doceniło jury festiwalu Sundance i przyznało Krystynie Jandzie tytuł najlepszej aktorki 2019 roku. Nagrodę odebrała z rąk amerykańskiego producenta Charlesa Gillberta.

 

Właśnie tę rolę doceniło jury festiwalu Sundance i przyznało Krystynie Jandzie tytuł najlepszej aktorki 2019 roku. Nagrodę odebrała z rąk amerykańskiego producenta Charlesa Gillberta.

 

Więcej niż aktorka

 

Aktorka w tym roku znalazła się także na liście 50 Śmiałych „Wysokich Obcasów”.

 

„Krystyna Janda jak mało kto potrafi utrzymać widzów przez 100 minut ze ściśniętymi gardłami, którzy ani drgną, by po zakończonym spektaklu bez końca bić brawo na stojąco” – pisał o niej Mike Urbaniak.

 

Choć podkreśla, że miłość do teatru i filmu to nie wszystko.

Niewiele jest w Polsce aktorek tak zaangażowanych społecznie – Krystyna Janda zabiera głos tam, gdzie zagrożona jest konstytucja i demokracja, tam, gdzie łamane są prawa człowieka, szczególnie prawa kobiet.

 

Janda jest tylko jedna

Na ekranie po raz pierwszy pojawiła się w 1973 roku w serialu „Czarne chmury”, ale dopiero rola Agnieszki w filmie Andrzeja Wajdy „Człowiek z marmuru” trzy lata później była przełomem w jej karierze.

 

Łącznie wystąpiła w sześciu filmach nagrodzonego Oscarem za całokształt twórczości reżysera.

Krystyna Janda najczęściej gra postacie silnych i zdecydowanych kobiet.

 

PSz,, wysokie obcasy.pl, 03.02.2019

 

http://www.wysokieobcasy.pl/wysokie-obcasy/7,157211,24425389,krystyna-janda-najlepsza-aktorka-festiwalu-sundance-2019.html?fbclid=IwAR0iKGUFtVP3EWvn5G8YwcTISyyBhSr1lJLAnFaym-IQolAit82BBU5yeGY

 

——————————— —————————- ————– ————————- ——————-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2019 Krystyna Janda. All rights reserved.